Comptroller

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DEFINITION of 'Comptroller'

A comptroller is a synonym for financial controller. Comptrollers oversee the financial reporting procedures and methodologies of a corporation. Comptrollers usually are senior members of an organization and tend to have university degrees in addition to a financial or accounting designation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Comptroller'

Accountants prepare financial statements which they pass off to the comptroller. This individual ensures their accuracy and adherence to proper format and standards.

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