Compulsive Shopping

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DEFINITION

An unhealthy obsession with shopping that materially interferes with the daily life of the afflicted. This ailment goes beyond mere consumerism and is psychological in nature. Symptoms include obsession with shopping, anxiety when not shopping, the constant need to shop and the purchase of unnecessary or unwanted items.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Compulsive shopping is a form of addiction. As with any other addiction, it can lead to professional, marital and family problems. Although there is some debate about whether this condition is truly a mental disorder, research seems to indicate that the use of antidepressants can be helpful in its treatment.


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