Conduit Issuer

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DEFINITION of 'Conduit Issuer'

An organization, usually a government agency, that issues municipal securities to raise capital for revenue-generating projects where the funds generated are used by a third party (known as the "conduit borrower") to make payments to investors. The conduit financing is typically backed by either the conduit borrower's credit or funds pledged toward the project by outside investors. If a project fails and the security goes into default, it falls to the conduit borrower's financial obligation, not the conduit issuer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Conduit Issuer'

Common types of conduit financing include industrial development revenue bonds (IDRBs), private activity bonds and housing revenue bonds (both for single-family and multifamily projects). Most conduit-issued securities are for projects to benefit the public at large (i.e. airports, docks, sewage facilities) or specific population segments (i.e. students, low-income home buyers, veterans).

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