Confederation Of British Industry - CBI

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DEFINITION of 'Confederation Of British Industry - CBI'

The premier lobbying organization for U.K. businesses on national and international issues. The mission of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) is to help create and sustain the conditions in which businesses in the United Kingdom can compete effectively and prosper. It achieves these objectives by working with the U.K. government, international legislators and policy-makers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Confederation Of British Industry - CBI'

The CBI was formed in 1965 and has offices in 13 distinct geographical areas in the United Kingdom. It also has offices in Brussels, Washington DC, Beijing and New Delhi. The main governing body of the CBI is its Council.

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