Confession Of Judgment

DEFINITION of 'Confession Of Judgment'

A written agreement signed by the defendant that accepts the liability and amount of damages that was agreed on. A confession of judgment is a way to circumvent normal court proceedings and avoid a lengthy legal process to resolve a dispute. Signing a confession of forfeits any of the rights the defendant has to dispute a claim in the future.





BREAKING DOWN 'Confession Of Judgment'

Also, the same effect of a confession of judgment can be attained by having a borrower sign a cognovit note when the borrow first becomes in debt to the lender. The note would say how much the debtor owed and that the debtor voluntarily subjects himself/herself to court authority to resolve any dispute. If the debtor defaults, the note could be presented to the court to obtain a judgment without even notifying the debtor of the court proceedings. Many people feel this is controversial because it doesn't allow the defendant to present a proper defense.




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