Congeneric Merger


DEFINITION of 'Congeneric Merger'

A type of merger where two companies are in the same or related industries but do not offer the same products. In a congeneric merger, the companies may share similar distribution channels, providing synergies for the merger.

BREAKING DOWN 'Congeneric Merger'

As a general rule, mergers fall into one of several categories, such as horizontal, vertical, congeneric or conglomerate. An example of a congeneric merger is Citigroup's acquisition of Travelers Insurance. While both were in the financial services industry, they had different product lines.

  1. Vertical Merger

    A merger between two companies producing different goods or services ...
  2. Horizontal Merger

    A merger occurring between companies in the same industry. Horizontal ...
  3. Mega Deal

    From the Greek megas, meaning great, this expression refers to ...
  4. Synergy

    The concept that the value and performance of two companies combined ...
  5. Conglomerate Merger

    A merger between firms that are involved in totally unrelated ...
  6. Merger

    The combining of two or more companies, generally by offering ...
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