Conglomeration

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DEFINITION of 'Conglomeration'

The process by which a conglomerate is created, as when a parent company begins to acquire subsidiaries. Sometimes conglomeration can refer to a time period when many conglomerates are formed simultaneously. One of the chief advantages of conglomeration is the immunity that it provides the parent company from potential takeovers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Conglomeration'

Conglomeration became an increasingly common and popular process in the 1950s, because it is a convenient way for parent companies to operate several related or complementary firms in conjunction with each other. But conglomeration also provides an avenue for parent firms to diversify into other lines of business.

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