Congressional Oversight Panel - COP

DEFINITION of 'Congressional Oversight Panel - COP'

A panel created by the U.S. Congress in 2008 to oversee for the U.S. Treasury's actions aimed at stabilizing the U.S. economy. The Congressional Oversight Panel (COP) is empowered to review official data and hold hearings in order to develop reports to assess the effect of the Treasury's actions on the economy.

BREAKING DOWN 'Congressional Oversight Panel - COP'

The COP was also instructed to review the current state of the financial system and evaluate the regulatory system's effectiveness in overseeing financial markets and protecting consumers. The creation of the COP was in conjunction with the creation of the Office of Stabilization (OFS) within the U.S. Treasury, that was used to implement $700 billion dollars of Federal spending through the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP).

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