Conglomerate Merger

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DEFINITION of 'Conglomerate Merger'

A merger between firms that are involved in totally unrelated business activities. There are two types of conglomerate mergers: pure and mixed. Pure conglomerate mergers involve firms with nothing in common, while mixed conglomerate mergers involve firms that are looking for product extensions or market extensions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Conglomerate Merger'

There are many reasons for firms to want to merge, which include increasing market share, synergy and cross selling. Firms also merge to diversify and reduce their risk exposure. However, if a conglomerate becomes too large as a result of acquisitions, the performance of the entire firm can suffer. This was seen during the conglomerate merger phase of the 1960s.

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