Conservative Growth

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DEFINITION of 'Conservative Growth'

An investment strategy that aims to grow invested capital over the long term. This strategy focuses on minimizing risk by making long-term investments in companies that show consistent growth over time. Conservative growth portfolios feature low asset turnover, or a high percentage of fixed assets on their balance sheets, and should employ a buy-and-hold investment philosophy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Conservative Growth'

Although investment funds, portfolio managers and investment advisors may claim to employ a conservative growth strategy, the actual assets held in some of these funds vary considerably. When investing in a fund that uses a conservative growth model, it is a good idea to perform regular checks on your portfolio's holdings to make sure they match the investment strategy the portfolio claims to use.

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