Consolidated Financial Statements

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DEFINITION of 'Consolidated Financial Statements'

The combined financial statements of a parent company and its subsidiaries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Consolidated Financial Statements'

Because consolidated financial statements present an aggregated look at the financial position of a parent and its subsidiaries, they enable you to gauge the overall health of an entire group of companies as opposed to one company's stand alone position.

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