Consortium Bank

DEFINITION of 'Consortium Bank'

A subsidiary bank created by numerous banks. A consortium bank is created to fund a specific project (such as providing affordable homeownership for low- and moderate-income home buyers) or to execute a specific deal (such as selling loans in the loan syndication market).

The consortium leverages individual banks' assets to achieve its objectives. All member banks have equal ownership shares – no one member has a controlling interest. After the bank's objective is met the consortium typically dissolves.

BREAKING DOWN 'Consortium Bank'

Consortium banks originated in the early 1960s and are predominantly found in Europe. They were originally created to enable smaller banks to participate in international banking activities. Consortium banks are not as active as in the past; however, examples can still be found both in the U.S. and overseas. Member banks can be headquartered in different countries.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between loan syndication and a consortium?

    In a very general sense, a consortium is any group of individuals or entities that decides to pool resources toward a given ... Read Full Answer >>
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