Consortium Bank

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DEFINITION of 'Consortium Bank'

A subsidiary bank created by numerous banks. A consortium bank is created to fund a specific project (such as providing affordable homeownership for low- and moderate-income home buyers) or to execute a specific deal (such as selling loans in the loan syndication market).

The consortium leverages individual banks' assets to achieve its objectives. All member banks have equal ownership shares – no one member has a controlling interest. After the bank's objective is met the consortium typically dissolves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Consortium Bank'

Consortium banks originated in the early 1960s and are predominantly found in Europe. They were originally created to enable smaller banks to participate in international banking activities. Consortium banks are not as active as in the past; however, examples can still be found both in the U.S. and overseas. Member banks can be headquartered in different countries.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between loan syndication and a consortium?

    In a very general sense, a consortium is any group of individuals or entities that decides to pool resources toward a given ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What role does a correspondent bank play in an international transaction?

    A correspondent bank is most typically used in international buy, sell or money transfer transactions to facilitate foreign ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a correspondent bank and intermediary bank?

    Correspondent and intermediary banks serve as third-party banks that coordinate with beneficiary banks to facilitate international ... Read Full Answer >>
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