Consortium

What is a 'Consortium'

A consortium is a group made up of two or more individuals, companies or governments that work together toward achieving a chosen objective. Each entity within the consortium is only responsible to the group in respect to the obligations that are set out in the consortium's contract. Therefore, every entity that is under the consortium remains independent in his or her normal business operations and has no say over another member's operations that are not related to the consortium.

BREAKING DOWN 'Consortium'

Consortiums are often used within the non-profit sector, specifically with educational institutions. They often pool resources such as libraries and professors and share them among the members of the group. Several groups of North American colleges and universities operate under consortiums.

For-profit consortiums also exist, but they are less prevalent. One of the most famous for-profit consortiums is the airline manufacturer Airbus.

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