Constant Currencies

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Constant Currencies'

An exchange rate that eliminates the effects of exchange rate fluctuations and that is used when calculating financial performance numbers. Companies with major foreign operations often use constant currencies when calculating their yearly performance measures.

BREAKING DOWN 'Constant Currencies'

For example, consider a French company that sells primarily abroad and sets its prices according to U.S. dollars. If sales increase 10% in dollar terms, but the dollar fell 5% against the franc during the year, only a 5% increase in sales will be reported in the accounts, unless a constant currency is applied in the calculation. In other words, the use of constant currencies allows companies to show performance unaffected by currency fluctuations.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Exchange Rate

    The price of a nation’s currency in terms of another currency. ...
  2. Currency

    A generally accepted form of money, including coins and paper ...
  3. Translation Risk

    The exchange rate risk associated with companies that deal in ...
  4. Translation Exposure

    The risk that a company's equities, assets, liabilities or income ...
  5. Forex - FX

    The market in which currencies are traded. The forex market is ...
  6. Transaction Risk

    The exchange rate risk associated with the time delay between ...
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Currency Exchange: Floating Rate Vs. Fixed Rate

    Baffled by exchange rates? Wonder why some currencies fluctuate while others are pegged? This article has the answers.
  2. Forex Education

    Dollarization Explained

    Find out how fledgling economies can find some stability in their currency and attract foreign investment.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    6 Factors That Influence Exchange Rates

    Find out how a currency's relative value reflects a country's economic health and impacts your investment returns.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Return on Net Assets

    Return on net assets measures a company’s financial performance.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Cost of Revenue

    The cost of revenue is the total costs a business incurs to manufacture and deliver a product or service.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Carrying Cost of Inventory

    The carrying cost of inventory is the cost a business pays for holding goods in stock.
  7. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Replacement Cost

    The replacement cost is the cost you’d have to pay to replace an asset with a similar asset at the present time and value.
  9. Economics

    How Does National Income Accounting Work?

    National income accounting is an economic term describing the system used by a country to gather data and determine aggregate economic activity.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the EBITDA/EV Multiple

    The EBITDA/EV multiple is a financial ratio that measures a company’s return on investment.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What types of companies benefit from reporting results utilizing constant currencies ...

    Any company that does a substantial amount of business in foreign countries, and is therefore subject to foreign currency ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How are foreign exchange rates affected by commodity price fluctuations?

    In the foreign exchange (forex) market, currency valuations move up and down as a result of many factors, including interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is the value of a pip determined?

    A pip in foreign exchange trading is a measure of a price movement in a currency pair. "Pip" is an acronym for price interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  2. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  3. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  4. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  5. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  6. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!