Construction Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Construction Bond'

A type of surety bond used by investors in construction projects to protect against an adverse event that causes disruptions, failure to complete the project due to insolvency of the builder(s), or the job's failure to meet contract specifications.


There are generally three parties involved in a construction bond – the party or parties building the project, the investor/eventual owners, and the surety company that backs the bond.


May also be called a "construction surety bond" or a "contract bond".

BREAKING DOWN 'Construction Bond'

Many things can go wrong in a large construction project. Because of this, construction bonds are almost a mandatory prerequisite of any project beyond a certain size, and for most (if not all) government and public works projects.


On larger projects, construction bonds may come in portions; one to protect against overall job completion and to specifications and another to protect against the cost of materials from suppliers and subcontractors.


Surety companies will evaluate the financial merits of the principal builder and charge a premium according to their calculated likelihood that an adverse event will occur.

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