Consumer Goods

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DEFINITION of 'Consumer Goods'

Products that are purchased for consumption by the average consumer. Alternatively called final goods, consumer goods are the end result of production and manufacturing and are what a consumer will see on the store shelf. Clothing, food, automobiles and jewelry are all examples of consumer goods. Basic materials such as copper are not considered consumer goods because they must be transformed into usable products.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Consumer Goods'

The measurement of consumer goods sales is important in the assessment of gross domestic product and in determining the health of the overall economy. Demand for consumer goods indicates whether consumers are willing to part with cash. Items are only counted as consumer goods once - if they are resold, they will not be included in economic calculations.

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