Consumer Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Consumer Credit'

A debt that someone incurs for the purpose of purchasing a good or service. This includes purchases made on credit cards, lines of credit and some loans.

Also referred to as "consumer debt".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Consumer Credit'

Consumer credit is basically the amount of credit used by consumers to purchase non-investment goods or services that are consumed and whose value depreciates quickly. This includes automobiles, recreational vehicles (RVs), education, boat and trailer loans but excludes debts taken out to purchase real estate or margin on investment accounts. For example, a mortgage for purchasing a house is not consumer credit. However, the 52 inch television you put on your credit card is

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