Consumer Internet Barometer

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DEFINITION

A quarterly survey report produced by the Conference Board and TNS NFO that records, analyzes and reports on the internet usage of 10,000 U.S. households. The survey seeks to measure:

1. the importance of the internet in the daily lives of households
2. overall satisfaction of internet users
3. online purchase characteristics, times and dates
4. users' perceptions of security for online transactions and general internet usage

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

As levels of internet use increase, it is expected that online purchases become a more important driver of the economy. Currently, a household is considered to be "online" if it reports being on the internet at least once per month.

The rate of response to the survey is very high, making the Consumer Internet Barometer one of the most widely relied upon measures of U.S. consumer internet use.


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