Contingent Convertibles - CoCos

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Contingent Convertibles - CoCos'

A security similar to a traditional convertible bond in that there is a strike price (the cost of the stock when the bond converts into stock). What differs is that there is another price, even higher than the strike price, which the company's stock price must reach before an investor has the right to make that conversion (known as the "upside contingency").

BREAKING DOWN 'Contingent Convertibles - CoCos'

Issuing contingent bonds is more advantageous to companies than issuing regular convertibles. Until an investor exercises the option, the company does not need to count shares in its calculation of diluted earnings. (Note: as of July 2004, the FASB's Emerging Issues Task Force proposed an accounting change that, if passed, would eliminate the accounting advantage of CoCos.)

RELATED TERMS
  1. Convertible Bond

    A bond that can be converted into a predetermined amount of the ...
  2. Mandatory Convertible

    A type of convertible bond that has a required conversion or ...
  3. Convertible Preferred Stock

    Preferred stock that includes an option for the holder to convert ...
  4. Convertibles

    Securities, usually bonds or preferred shares, that can be converted ...
  5. Common Stock

    A security that represents ownership in a corporation. Holders ...
  6. Conversion Price

    The price per share at which a convertible security, such as ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Introduction To Convertible Preferred Shares

    These securities offer an answer for investors who want the profit potential of stocks but not the risk.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Convertible Bonds: An Introduction

    Find out about the nuts and bolts, pros and cons of investing in bonds.
  3. Investing

    Five Things to Consider Now for Your 401(k)

    If you can’t stand still, when it comes to checking your 401 (k) balance, focus on these 5 steps to help channel your worries in a more productive manner.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Return on Net Assets

    Return on net assets measures a company’s financial performance.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Cost of Revenue

    The cost of revenue is the total costs a business incurs to manufacture and deliver a product or service.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Carrying Cost of Inventory

    The carrying cost of inventory is the cost a business pays for holding goods in stock.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Guggenheim Enhanced Short Dur

    Find out about the Guggenheim Enhanced Short Duration ETF, and learn detailed information about this fund that focuses on fixed-income securities.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Core Growth Allocation

    Find out about the iShares Core Growth Allocation Fund, and learn detailed information about its characteristics, suitability and recommendations.
  9. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: SPDR Barclays Short Term Hi Yld Bd

    Find out about the SPDR Barclays Short Term High Yield Bond ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the fund that tracks short-term, high-yield corporate bonds.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    The maximum Social Security disability benefit amount for a single eligible person in 2015 is $1,165 per month, but you can ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!