Contingent Order

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DEFINITION of 'Contingent Order'

1. An order involving the simultaneous execution of two or more transactions.

2. An order whose execution depends upon the execution and/or price of another security.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Contingent Order'

These types of orders are generally placed for option strategies where two separate transactions must occur at the same time. An example is a buy-write, where an investor would buy a stock and sell a call simultaneously.

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