Continuing Claims

DEFINITION of 'Continuing Claims'

Continuing claims refers to unemployed workers that qualify for benefits under unemployment insurance. In order to be included in continuing claims, the person must have been covered by unemployment insurance and be currently receiving benefits. Data on unemployment claims is published by the Department of Labor on a weekly basis, allowing for frequent updates on the levels of unemployment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Continuing Claims'

The number of continuing claims is commonly reported as an indication of the total number of unemployed persons. However, this interpretation is not completely accurate since continuing claims figures excludes several groups, including workers not eligible for unemployment insurance and workers who have exhausted their benefits. For instance, in 2008, only 36% of unemployed persons received unemployment benefits according to the Department of Labor.

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