Continuous Operations

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DEFINITION of 'Continuous Operations'

Activities within a business or organization that are ongoing and sustained, and that are not designed to cease except for in an emergency. Continuous operations will be expected to continue seven days a week until the project is complete. Some continuous operations will run 24 hours a day.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Continuous Operations'

Not all continuous operation activities have to be done by humans. In the telecommunications industry, for example, the equipment designed to route calls runs continuously, even when employees are not present. This allows customers to make calls at any time.

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