Continuous Operations

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Continuous Operations'

Activities within a business or organization that are ongoing and sustained, and that are not designed to cease except for in an emergency. Continuous operations will be expected to continue seven days a week until the project is complete. Some continuous operations will run 24 hours a day.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Continuous Operations'

Not all continuous operation activities have to be done by humans. In the telecommunications industry, for example, the equipment designed to route calls runs continuously, even when employees are not present. This allows customers to make calls at any time.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Heavy Industry

    Relates to a type of business that typically carries a high capital ...
  2. Sector

    1. An area of the economy in which businesses share the same ...
  3. Industry

    A classification that refers to a group of companies that are ...
  4. Tertiary Industry

    The segment of the economy that provides services to its consumers. ...
  5. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
  6. Sharpe Ratio

    A ratio developed by Nobel laureate William F. Sharpe to measure ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between an industry and a sector?

    The terms industry and sector are often used interchangeably to describe a group of companies that operate in the same segment ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is reconciliation treated under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)?

    The generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, provide different reconciliation rules for balancing many kinds of ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where did the concept of reconciliation in accounting come from?

    Financial accountants perform reconciliation to ensure that the balances of two accounts are in agreement. The process by ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are all fixed costs considered sunk costs?

    In accounting, finance and economics, all sunk costs are fixed costs. However, not all fixed costs are considered to be sunk. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between work in progress (WIP) and raw materials in accounting?

    Raw materials and works in progress (WIP) are distinct categories in financial accounting for business inventory. Each applies ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How is accounting in the United States different from international accounting?

    Despite major efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Great Company Or Growing Industry?

    Look at the big picture when choosing a company - what you see may really be a stage in its industry's growth.
  2. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Water: The Ultimate Commodity

    Opportunities to invest in this scarce resource are flowing freely - dive in!
  4. Personal Finance

    How To Pick The Best Telecom Stocks

    This ever-changing industry can leave investors scratching their heads. Find out which metrics matter.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  6. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Geometric Mean

    The average of a set of products, the calculation of which is commonly used to determine the performance results of an investment or portfolio.
  8. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  10. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
  2. Wash Trading

    The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading ...
  3. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  4. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  5. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  6. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
Trading Center