Continuous Operations

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Continuous Operations'

Activities within a business or organization that are ongoing and sustained, and that are not designed to cease except for in an emergency. Continuous operations will be expected to continue seven days a week until the project is complete. Some continuous operations will run 24 hours a day.

BREAKING DOWN 'Continuous Operations'

Not all continuous operation activities have to be done by humans. In the telecommunications industry, for example, the equipment designed to route calls runs continuously, even when employees are not present. This allows customers to make calls at any time.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Heavy Industry

    Relates to a type of business that typically carries a high capital ...
  2. Sector

    1. An area of the economy in which businesses share the same ...
  3. Industry

    A classification that refers to a group of companies that are ...
  4. Tertiary Industry

    The segment of the economy that provides services to its consumers. ...
  5. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of ...
  6. Trade Credit

    An agreement where a customer can purchase goods on account (without ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Great Company Or Growing Industry?

    Look at the big picture when choosing a company - what you see may really be a stage in its industry's growth.
  2. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Water: The Ultimate Commodity

    Opportunities to invest in this scarce resource are flowing freely - dive in!
  4. Personal Finance

    How To Pick The Best Telecom Stocks

    This ever-changing industry can leave investors scratching their heads. Find out which metrics matter.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Examining Mexico's Trillion-Dollar GDP

    Examining the gross domestic product growth and composition of Mexico, the second largest economy in Latin America
  6. Economics

    Explaining Accounting Conservatism

    Accounting conservatism is a principal that requires accounting rules be applied with high degrees of verification.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What Causes Inflation in the United States

    Inflation is the main catalyst behind U.S monetary policy. But what causes this phenomenon of sustained rising prices? Read on to find out.
  8. Term

    What are Non-GAAP Earnings?

    Non-GAAP earnings are a company’s earnings that are not reported according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Switching Costs

    Consumers incur switching costs when they receive a monetary or other type of penalty for changing a supplier, brand or product.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Return on Net Assets

    Return on net assets measures a company’s financial performance.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between an industry and a sector?

    The terms industry and sector are often used interchangeably to describe a group of companies that operate in the same segment ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  2. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  3. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  4. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  5. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  6. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!