Continuous Compounding

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DEFINITION

The process of earning interest on top of interest. The interest is earned constantly, and immediately begins earning interest on itself.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

This is an extreme case of compounding, most interest is compounded on a monthly, quarterly, or semiannual basis.


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