Continuous Compounding

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DEFINITION of 'Continuous Compounding'

The process of earning interest on top of interest. The interest is earned constantly, and immediately begins earning interest on itself.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Continuous Compounding'

This is an extreme case of compounding, most interest is compounded on a monthly, quarterly, or semiannual basis.

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