Continuous Compounding

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DEFINITION of 'Continuous Compounding'

The process of earning interest on top of interest. The interest is earned constantly, and immediately begins earning interest on itself.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Continuous Compounding'

This is an extreme case of compounding, most interest is compounded on a monthly, quarterly, or semiannual basis.

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