Contributed Surplus

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DEFINITION of 'Contributed Surplus'

The amount of money that a company earns from sources other than its profits, such as when a company issues and sells shares at a price greater than their par value. The contributed surplus figure helps both investors and the company to distinguish between non-operational and operational income. It is found within the balance sheet.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Contributed Surplus'

If this value was combined with operational earnings, investors would have a hard time forecasting relatively accurate future earnings because earnings from contributed surplus are not a part of ongoing business operations.

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