Controlled Disbursement

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DEFINITION of 'Controlled Disbursement'

A technique commonly employed in corporate cash management. Controlled disbursement is used to regulate the flow of checks through the banking system on a daily basis, usually by mandating once-daily distributions of checks (usually early in the day.) This is done in order to meet certain investment or fund management objectives.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Controlled Disbursement'

Controlled disbursement is generally employed to maximize an institution's available cash for investment or debt payments. This allows for excess funds to be invested in the money market for as long as possible. This technique is the opposite approach to delayed disbursement or the Federal Reserve float.

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