Conversion Parity Price

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Conversion Parity Price'

The price paid for a share of stock purchased by exercising the option on a convertible security. The conversion parity price is the effective price paid by the investor, and is calculated by dividing the market price of the convertible security by the conversion ratio, which is the number of shares a convertible security can be converted into.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Conversion Parity Price'

For example, a convertible bond with a par value of $1,000 and can be exchanged for 20 shares of common stock. The conversion parity price would be $50 ($1,000/20 shares). Investors can limit risk by purchasing a convertible security when the conversion parity price is close to the market price for the common stock, and the price of the common stock is expected to rise in the future.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Convertible Bond

    A bond that can be converted into a predetermined amount of the ...
  2. Convertible Preferred Stock

    Preferred stock that includes an option for the holder to convert ...
  3. Convertibles

    Securities, usually bonds or preferred shares, that can be converted ...
  4. Common Stock

    A security that represents ownership in a corporation. Holders ...
  5. Conversion Ratio

    The number of common shares received at the time of conversion ...
  6. Ginnie Mae Pass Through

    A type of investment issued by the Government National Mortgage ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. To what extent are utility stocks affected by changes in interest rates?

    Utility stocks are definitely subject to interest rate risk and can be significantly impacted by changes in interest rates. Competition ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between term structure and a yield curve?

    There is no difference between term structure and a yield curve; the yield curve is simply another name to describe the term ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is term structure theory of importance to economists?

    The term structure theory, also known as the term structure of interest rates, is important to economists because it lets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the top high yield bond ETFs?

    Three of the most popular high-yield bond exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are the Peritus High Yield ETF (HYLD), the SPDR ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why has the market for high yield bonds grown so much?

    Reasons for the rapid growth of the high-yield bond market include the creation of new types of issues, a prolonged period ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can electricity be traded as a commodity by an individual investor?

    Electricity can be traded in the financial marketplace like any other commodity. Electricity futures trading offers an alternative ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    A Primer On Preferred Stocks

    Offering both income and relative security, these uncommon shares may work for you.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Are High-Yield Bonds Too Risky?

    Despite their reputation, the debt securities known as "junk bonds" may actually reduce risk in your portfolio.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Introduction To Convertible Preferred Shares

    These securities offer an answer for investors who want the profit potential of stocks but not the risk.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Convertible Bonds: Pros And Cons For Companies And Investors

    Find out why businesses choose this type of financing and what effect this has on investors.
  5. Options & Futures

    The Mandatory Convertible: A "Must Have" For Your Portfolio?

    Mandatory convertibles are a little understood security with some distinct advantages. Find out if they are right for you.
  6. Trading Systems & Software

    The Fast-Paced World of Libor & Fixed Income Arbitrage

    LIBOR is an essential part of implementing the swap spread arbitrage strategy for fixed income arbitrage. Here is a step-by-step explanation of how it works.
  7. Savings

    Explaining Term Deposits

    A term deposit (more often called a certificate of deposit or CD) is a deposit account that is made for a specific period of time.
  8. Economics

    What's a Maturity Date?

    Maturity date is the final date when any remaining principal and any unpaid interest are due on a debt.
  9. Professionals

    Worried About Stocks? Try on Convertibles

    Convertibles are a good hedge against equity market risk (if you're o.k. with losing a bit of upside potential).
  10. Stock Analysis

    Playing Rising Rates with Ultra-Short Term Bonds

    With rising rates likely, investors may want to consider adding a dose of ultra-short bonds to their portfolios. Here are some ETFs to consider.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!