Currency Convertibility

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DEFINITION of 'Currency Convertibility'

The ease with which a country's currency can be converted into gold or another currency. Convertibility is extremely important for international commerce. When a currency in inconvertible, it poses a risk and barrier to trade with foreigners who have no need for the domestic currency.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Currency Convertibility'

Government restrictions can often result in a currency with a low convertibility. For example, a government with low reserves of hard foreign currency often restrict currency convertibility because the government would not be in a position to intervene in the foreign exchange market (i.e. revalue, devalue) to support their own currency if and when necessary.

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