Chief Operating Officer - COO

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DEFINITION of 'Chief Operating Officer - COO'

The senior manager who is responsible for managing the company's day-to-day operations and reporting them to the chief executive officer (CEO).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chief Operating Officer - COO'

A company needs a chief operating officer (COO) because the CEO is usually too busy to monitor production quotas and other factors on a daily basis.

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