Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE'

The Copenhagen Stock Exchange serves as Denmark's official market for securities. The CSE became a limited company in 1996 and lists shares, fixed income instruments and derivatives. The exchange uses an electronic ordering system to facilitate efficient order matching.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE'

The Copenhagen Stock Exchange is a member of the OMX Exchange group, made up of such markets as the Stockholm, Helsinki and Iceland exchanges. The CSE manages the C20, a stock index containing 20 of the exchange's blue chip companies. Investors can buy or sell futures and options with the C20 Index as the underlying asset.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Nasdaq

    A global electronic marketplace for buying and selling securities, ...
  2. Iceland Stock Exchange – ICEX

    A stock exchange located in Reykjavik, Iceland. The Iceland Stock ...
  3. Copey

    Colloquial term used by currency traders for the Danish krone, ...
  4. Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SHZ) .SZ

    One of three stock exchanges in the People's Republic of China, ...
  5. Index

    A statistical measure of change in an economy or a securities ...
  6. American Stock Exchange - AMEX

    The third-largest stock exchange by trading volume in the United ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What happens if a software glitch fails to execute the strike price I set?

    If you've ever suffered the frustrating experience of having an order not filled or had a strike price fail to execute because ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What types of companies benefit from reporting results utilizing constant currencies ...

    Any company that does a substantial amount of business in foreign countries, and is therefore subject to foreign currency ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the differences between B-shares and H-shares traded on Chinese stock exchanges?

    Equity listings in China generally fall under three primary categories: A shares, B shares and H shares. B shares represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. In what market situations might a short put be a profitable trade?

    Short puts would be a profitable trade in low-volatility bull markets or range-bound markets. Selling puts is a strategy ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the differences between H-shares and A-shares on Chinese and Hong Kong stock ...

    Publicly trade companies in China generally fall under three share categories: A shares, B shares and H-shares. A-shares ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Getting To Know The Stock Exchanges

    Here are the answers to all the questions you have about stock exchanges but are too afraid to ask!
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Go International With Foreign Index Funds

    As global trade continues to expand and the world's economies grow, spice up your portfolio with these exciting opportunities.
  3. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Getting Into International Investing

    Diversifying can mean not only investing in various asset classes but also venturing beyond domestic exchanges.
  5. Economics

    The Stock Market: A Look Back

    The past century was marked by furious economic change. What can it tell us about what lies ahead?
  6. Investing Basics

    What Does Spot Price Mean?

    Spot price is the current price at which a security may be bought or sold.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is a Greenshoe Option?

    A greenshoe option is a provision in an underwriting agreement that allows the underwriter to buy up to 15% of the shares in an IPO at the offer price.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Does a Clearing House Do?

    A clearing house is a third-party agency or separate entity that acts as a go-between for buyers and sellers in financial markets.
  9. Economics

    The Most Likely Outcome For Greece

    After more than five years of a Greek drama, most of us have become fatigued with hearing about Greece’s debt problems, the one issue that won’t go away.
  10. Options & Futures

    How The New NYSE Binary Options Work

    The New York Stock Exchange has launched its own version of binary options called Binary Return Derivatives Options or ByRDs.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  2. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
  6. Risk-Return Tradeoff

    The principle that potential return rises with an increase in risk. Low levels of uncertainty (low-risk) are associated with ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!