Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE

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DEFINITION of 'Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE'

The Copenhagen Stock Exchange serves as Denmark's official market for securities. The CSE became a limited company in 1996 and lists shares, fixed income instruments and derivatives. The exchange uses an electronic ordering system to facilitate efficient order matching.

BREAKING DOWN 'Copenhagen Stock Exchange - CSE'

The Copenhagen Stock Exchange is a member of the OMX Exchange group, made up of such markets as the Stockholm, Helsinki and Iceland exchanges. The CSE manages the C20, a stock index containing 20 of the exchange's blue chip companies. Investors can buy or sell futures and options with the C20 Index as the underlying asset.

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  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

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