Copula

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Copula'

A statistical measure that represents a multivariate uniform distribution, which examines the association or dependence between many variables. Although the statistical calculation of a copula was invented in 1957, it was not applied to financial markets and finance until the late '90s.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Copula'

Copulas are a mathematical tool used in finance to help identify economic capital adequacy, market risk, credit risk and operational risk. Interdependence of returns of two or more assets is usually calculated using the correlation coefficient. However, correlation only works well with normal distributions, while distributions in financial markets are mostly skewed. The copula, therefore, has been applied to areas of finance such as option pricing and portfolio value-at-risk to deal with the skewness.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Credit Risk

    The risk of loss of principal or loss of a financial reward stemming ...
  2. Correlation

    In the world of finance, a statistical measure of how two securities ...
  3. Covariance

    A measure of the degree to which returns on two risky assets ...
  4. Correlation Coefficient

    A measure that determines the degree to which two variable's ...
  5. Binomial Option Pricing Model

    An options valuation method developed by Cox, et al, in 1979. ...
  6. Value At Risk - VaR

    A statistical technique used to measure and quantify the level ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the relationship between research and development and innovation?

    Although it's possible to achieve innovation without research and development and it's possible to conduct research and development ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting?

    The common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting are all the concepts and techniques that surround planning and ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is abatement cost accounted for on financial statements?

    Abatement costs are accounted for on a company's financial statements through increases in either cost of goods sold or operational ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I use the rule of 72 to estimate compounding periods?

    The rule of 72 is best used to estimate compounding periods that are factors of two (2, 4, 12, 200 and so on). This is because ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  2. Insurance

    The Dangers Of Over-Diversifying Your Portfolio

    If you diversify too much, you might not lose much, but you won't gain much either.
  3. Active Trading

    Modern Portfolio Theory: Why It's Still Hip

    See why investors today still follow this old set of principles that reduce risk and increase returns through diversification.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the Profitability Index

    The profitability index (PI) is a modification of the net present value method of assessing an investment’s attractiveness.
  5. Economics

    What is Neoliberalism?

    Neoliberalism is a little-used term to describe an economy where the government has few, if any, controls on economic factors.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Monte Carlo Simulation

    Monte Carlo simulation is an analysis done by running a number of different variables through a model in order to determine the different outcomes.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Limited Liability

    Limited liability is a legal concept that protects equity owners from personal losses due to their ownership interest in the company.
  8. Economics

    Calculating Income Elasticity of Demand

    Income elasticity of demand is a measure of how consumer demand changes when income changes.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Implicit Costs

    An implicit cost is any cost associated with not taking a certain action.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Empirical Rule

    The empirical rule provides a quick estimate of the spread of data in a normal statistical distribution.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  2. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  4. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  5. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  6. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!