Core Assets

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DEFINITION of 'Core Assets'

An essential, important or valuable property of a business without which a company cannot carry on with its profit-making activities. A business would dissolve without its core assets, and companies that sell off core assets are usually liquidating and on the verge of bankruptcy.

BREAKING DOWN 'Core Assets'

Core assets are crucial to the continued success of a business. These assets help the business run and stay viable. Companies that are having money trouble tend to raise money initially by selling off non-core assets (assets that are not essential to the continued functioning of a business), not core assets.

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