Core Assets


DEFINITION of 'Core Assets'

An essential, important or valuable property of a business without which a company cannot carry on with its profit-making activities. A business would dissolve without its core assets, and companies that sell off core assets are usually liquidating and on the verge of bankruptcy.


Core assets are crucial to the continued success of a business. These assets help the business run and stay viable. Companies that are having money trouble tend to raise money initially by selling off non-core assets (assets that are not essential to the continued functioning of a business), not core assets.

  1. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  2. Non-Core Assets

    Assets that are either not essential or simply no longer used ...
  3. Financial Statements

    Records that outline the financial activities of a business, ...
  4. Capital Asset

    A type of asset that is not easily sold in the regular course ...
  5. Core Liquidity

    Cash and other financial assets that banks possess that can easily ...
  6. Core Holding

    A long-term investment that forms the foundation of an investor's ...
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  1. Does working capital measure liquidity?

    Working capital is a commonly used metric, not only for a company’s liquidity but also for its operational efficiency and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I read and analyze an income statement?

    The income statement, also known as the profit and loss (P&L) statement, is the financial statement that depicts the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can working capital be too high?

    A company's working capital ratio can be too high in the sense that an excessively high ratio is generally considered an ... Read Full Answer >>
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    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>

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