What is 'Core Capital'

Core capital is the minimum amount of capital that a thrift bank, such as a savings bank or savings and loan company, must have on hand in order to comply with Federal Home Loan Bank regulations. Core capital consists of equity capital and declared reserves. The minimum requirement was put in place to ensure that consumers are protected when creating financial accounts.

BREAKING DOWN 'Core Capital'

Following the financial crisis of 2008, regulators began focusing heavily on banks' Tier 1 capital, which consists of core capital, but can also include nonredeemable, noncumulative preferred equity. This is more stringent than normal capital ratios, which can also include Tier 2, and lesser-quality capital.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between tier 1 capital and tier 2 capital?

    Tier 1 capital is a bank's core capital, whereas tier 2 capital is a bank's supplementary capital. A bank's total capital ... Read Answer >>
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    Understand what the capital adequacy ratio is and why it is a very important metric of financial soundness for evaluating ... Read Answer >>
  3. What measures can be used to evaluate the capital adequacy of a bank?

    Examine some of the different financial measurements that are most commonly used to assess capital adequacy within the banking ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the minimum capital adequacy ratio that must be attained under Basel III?

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  5. How does total capital investment influence economic growth?

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