Corner

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DEFINITION of 'Corner'

1. The act of securing enough controlling interest or ownership within a single security so that manipulation of price can occur.

2. A rare situation occurring in commodity markets wherein the quantity of underlying securities and commodities available are exceeded by the commitments of delivery quantities on future contracts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corner'

1. When someone is said to have "cornered the market," he or she has gained significant power over the manipulation of quantity and price.

2. In other words, the obligations on future contracts to deliver a particular commodity greatly outweigh the actual amount of the commodity available. For example, a freak tornado sweeping through Hawaii and killing all pineapple crops would result in a corner. The tornado would drastically reduce the quantity of pineapples available for delivery against the delivery obligations of future contracts that were previously created.

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