Corporate Capital

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Capital'

The assets a business possesses that can serve as an income shock absorber to a specific class of stakeholders. Should the company experience financial difficulty, the capital in one class of stakeholder would be decreased in order to protect another stakeholder with a senior priority.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Capital'

In the most ideal situation, where a business has very little risk of defaulting on a debt obligation, the amount of corporate capital would be close to the amount of the firm's shareholder's equity (total assets minus total liabilities). In the event of financial difficulties, any losses sustained would initially impact the firm's corporate capital (in the form of descending company's equity) before it would impact other senior stakeholders (such as bondholders).

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