Corporate Culture

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Culture'

The beliefs and behaviors that determine how a company's employees and management interact and handle outside business transactions. Often, corporate culture is implied, not expressly defined, and develops organically over time from the cumulative traits of the people the company hires. A company's culture will be reflected in its dress code, business hours, office setup, employee benefits, turnover, hiring decisions, treatment of clients, client satisfaction and every other aspect of operations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Culture'

Google is a company that is well-known for its employee-friendly corporate culture. It explicitly defines itself as unconventional and offers perks such as telecommuting, flex time, tuition reimbursement, free employee lunches, on-site doctors and, at its corporate headquarters in Moutain View, Calif., on-site services like oil changes, massages, fitness classes, car washes and a hair stylist. Google's corporate culture has helped it to consistently earn a high ranking on Fortune magazine's list of "100 Best Companies to Work For."



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