Corporate Financing Committee

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Financing Committee '

A regulatory group that reviews documentation that is submitted by underwriters. A corporate financing committee develops policies concerning public equity and debt financing, and considers the fairness and reasonableness of underwriting compensation and arrangements that are proposed by members. In the United States, a corporate financing committee acts in compliance with U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requirements to ensure that proposed underwriting terms and conditions that apply to public companies are fair to both the issuer and investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Financing Committee '

The "Corporate Financing Committee" was a standing committee of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD), prior to the association's 2007 merger with the New York Stock Exchange's regulation committee, to form the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). Their mission is to protect investors in the United States by making sure the securities industry operates in a fair and honest manner, by overseeing almost 4,500 brokerage firms.

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