Corporate Fraud

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Fraud'

Activities undertaken by an individual or company that are done in a dishonest or illegal manner, and are designed to give an advantage to the perpetrating individual or company. Corporate fraud schemes go beyond the scope of an employee's stated position, and are marked by their complexity and economic impact on the business, other employees and outside parties.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Fraud'

Corporate fraud can be difficult to prevent and to catch. By creating effective policies, a system of checks and balances and physical security, a company may limit the extent to which fraud can take place. It is considered a white collar crime.

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