Corporate Headquarters

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Corporate Headquarters'


A place where a company's executive offices and executives' direct support staff are located. Corportate headquarters is considered a business' most prestigious location. A corporation's headquarters may also bring prestige to the city it is located in and help attract other businesses to the area. Businesses frequently locate their corporate headquarters in large cities because of the greater business opportunities available there.

Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Corporate Headquarters'


A business' corporate headquarters is not necessarily the location where the majority of its employees work. Offices of a business that are not the corporate headquarters are called "branch offices". In the vernacular, corporate headquarters may be referred to simply as "corporate". For example, a manager might say to an employee, "Our rules regarding sick days come from corporate."

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