Corporate Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Bond'

A debt security issued by a corporation and sold to investors. The backing for the bond is usually the payment ability of the company, which is typically money to be earned from future operations. In some cases, the company's physical assets may be used as collateral for bonds.

Corporate bonds are considered higher risk than government bonds. As a result, interest rates are almost always higher, even for top-flight credit quality companies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Bond'

Corporate bonds are issued in blocks of $1,000 in par value, and almost all have a standard coupon payment structure. Corporate bonds may also have call provisions to allow for early prepayment if prevailing rates change.

Corporate bonds, i.e. debt financing, are a major source of capital for many businesses along with equity and bank loans/lines of credit. Generally speaking, a company needs to have some consistent earnings potential to be able to offer debt securities to the public at a favorable coupon rate. The higher a company's perceived credit quality, the easier it becomes to issue debt at low rates and issue higher amounts of debt.

Most corporate bonds are taxable with terms of more than one year. Corporate debt that matures in less than one year is typically called "commercial paper".

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Where can I find information about corporate bond issues?

    Information about new and existing corporate bond issues is published regularly in financial newspapers, such as The Wall ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What debt/equity ratio is common for companies in the telecommunications sector?

    Telecommunications companies engage in capital-intensive projects that require large investments in infrastructure, wireless ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When should a company consider issuing a corporate bond vs. issuing stock?

    A company should consider issuing a corporate bond versus issuing stock after it has already exhausted all internal forms ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is a corporate bond taxed?

    A corporate bond is taxed through the interest earned on the bond, through capital gains or losses earned in the early sale ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the tax benefits of establishing a sinking fund?

    The primary tax benefit available through the creation of a sinking fund is a deduction for interest payments made. The other ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Which commodities are the main input materials for the chemicals sector?

    Some of the most well-known no-load funds are the DoubleLine Total Return Bond Fund (DLTNX), Vanguard Short-Term Investment-Grade ... Read Full Answer >>
  7. Is there a difference between financial ratio analysis and accounting ratio analysis?

    The economic factors that influence corporate bond yields are interest rates, inflation, the yield curve and economic growth. ... Read Full Answer >>
  8. What nations other than the U.S. have risk-free interest rates?

    Countries other than the United States that have risk-free interest rates are Canada, the European Union, Japan, the United ... Read Full Answer >>
  9. Who are the key players in the bond market?

    The bond market can essentially be broken down into three main groups: issuers, underwriters and purchasers. The issuers ... Read Full Answer >>
  10. Can a bond be traded over-the-counter?

    Bonds can be traded over-the-counter (OTC) and, in fact, the majority of corporate bonds that are issued by private and public ... Read Full Answer >>

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