Corporate Cannibalism

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Cannibalism'

An act of self-infringement upon market share by corporations through the issuance of new products.

Also known as "market cannibalization."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Cannibalism'

Corporate cannibalism occurs when companies introduce new products into a market where these products are already established. In effect, the new products are competing against their own incumbent products.

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