Corporate Citizenship

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Citizenship'

The extent to which businesses are socially responsible for meeting legal, ethical and economic responsibilities placed on them by shareholders. The aim is for businesses to create higher standards of living and quality of life in the communities in which they operate, while still preserving profitability for stakeholders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Citizenship'

As demand for socially responsible corporations increases, investors, consumers and employees are now more willing to use their individual power to punish companies that do not share their values. For example, investors who find out about a company's negative corporate citizenship practices could boycott its products or services, refuse to invest in its stock or speak out against that company among family and friends.

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