Corporate Finance

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Finance'

1) The financial activities related to running a corporation.

2) A division or department that oversees the financial activities of a company. Corporate finance is primarily concerned with maximizing shareholder value through long-term and short-term financial planning and the implementation of various strategies. Everything from capital investment decisions to investment banking falls under the domain of corporate finance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Finance'

Among the financial activities that a corporate finance department is involved with are capital investment decisions. Should a proposed investment be made? How should the company pay for it; with equity or with debt, or combination of both? Should shareholders be offered dividends on their investment in the company? These are just some of the questions a corporate financial officer attempts to answer on a consistent basis. Short-term issues include the management of current assets and current liabilities, inventory control, investments and other short-term financial issues. Long-term issues include new capital purchases and investments.

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