Correlation Coefficient

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DEFINITION of 'Correlation Coefficient'

A measure that determines the degree to which two variable's movements are associated.

The correlation coefficient is calculated as:

 

Correlation Coefficient

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Correlation Coefficient'

The correlation coefficient will vary from -1 to +1. A -1 indicates perfect negative correlation, and +1 indicates perfect positive correlation.

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