Correspondent

DEFINITION of 'Correspondent'

The name given to a bank, broker, dealer, or financial institution that acts on behalf of another financial institution with limited or restricted access to the financial markets where a transaction must occur.

BREAKING DOWN 'Correspondent'

Commonly done by smaller financial corporations that don't necessarily have the capital to enter into foreign markets and set up new operations. This is a cheaper method of providing international services to clients through agreements and partnerships.

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