Cost Control

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DEFINITION of 'Cost Control'

The practice of managing and/or reducing business expenses. Cost controls starts by the businesses identifying what their costs are and evaluate whether those costs are reasonable and affordable. Then, if necessary, they can look for ways to cut costs through methods such as cutting back, moving to a less expensive plan or changing service providers. The cost-control process seeks to manage expenses ranging from phone, internet and utility bills to employee payroll and outside professional services.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cost Control'

To be profitable, companies must not only earn revenues, but also control costs. If costs are too high, profit margins will be too low, making it difficult for a company to succeed against its competitors. In the case of a public company, if costs are too high, the company's may find that its share price is depressed and that it is difficult to attract investors.



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