Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

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DEFINITION of 'Cost-Volume Profit Analysis'

A method of cost accounting used in managerial economics. Cost-volume profit analysis is based upon determining the breakeven point of cost and volume of goods. It can be useful for managers making short-term economic decisions, and also for general educational purposes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cost-Volume Profit Analysis'

Cost-volume profit analysis makes several assumptions in order to be relevant. It often assumes that the sales price, fixed costs and variable cost per unit are constant. Running this analysis involves using several equations using price, cost and other variables and plotting them out on an economic graph.

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