Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

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DEFINITION of 'Cost-Volume Profit Analysis'

A method of cost accounting used in managerial economics. Cost-volume profit analysis is based upon determining the breakeven point of cost and volume of goods. It can be useful for managers making short-term economic decisions, and also for general educational purposes.
 

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS'Cost-Volume Profit Analysis'

Cost-volume profit analysis makes several assumptions in order to be relevant. It often assumes that the sales price, fixed costs and variable cost per unit are constant. Running this analysis involves using several equations using price, cost and other variables and plotting them out on an economic graph.
 

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the differences between absorption costing and variable costing?

    Absorption costing includes all costs, including fixed costs, in figuring the cost of production, while variable costing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a company determine the right level of sales volume?

    A company determines the right level of sales volume by conducting a cost-volume-profit analysis. This helps a company figure ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
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