Certificate Of Government Receipts - COUGRs

DEFINITION of 'Certificate Of Government Receipts - COUGRs'

U.S. Treasury fixed-income securities that are stripped of their coupon payments and provide payment of face value. These are synthetic securities offered by the A.G. Becker Paribas firm.

BREAKING DOWN 'Certificate Of Government Receipts - COUGRs'

COUGRs are part of the "feline" family of synthetic zero-coupon Treasury securities, which includes CATS and TIGRs. This default-free family of products provides safety of principal and transparent profits. COUGRs sold at a discount and redeemed at face value because there are no interest payments during the life of the security.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a stripped bond?

    The quick answer to this question is that a stripped bond is a bond that has had its main components broken up into a zero-coupon ... Read Answer >>
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    The correct answer is d. TIPS are a special type of Treasury note or bond that offers protection from inflation. When you ... Read Answer >>
  3. What are the main disadvantages of fixed income securities?

    Learn why fixed-income securities, despite offering the luxury of guaranteed, regular cash payments, confer several disadvantages ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a bond's yield rate and its coupon rate?

    Learn why bond coupon payments, which are a series of fixed payments made to a bondholder throughout the life of the bond, ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a zero-coupon bond and a regular bond?

    The difference between a zero-coupon bond and a regular bond is that a zero-coupon bond does not pay coupons, or interest ... Read Answer >>
  6. Zero coupon bonds are frequently cited as a popular investment vehicle for education ...

    The correct answer is c. Zero coupon bonds, as the name implies, pay no interest or coupon payments. They are bought (and ... Read Answer >>
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