Coverage Initiated

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DEFINITION of 'Coverage Initiated'

When a brokerage or analyst issues his or her first rating on a particular stock.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Coverage Initiated'

The media usually provides notice to investors that coverage has been initiated. Upon commencement of coverage, the analyst will usually publish an "initiating coverage" report on the stock, and subsequently issue periodic updates.

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