Covered Writer

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DEFINITION of 'Covered Writer'

An options seller who owns the underlying security represented by the options contract. A covered writer holds the underlying security as a hedge against the options contract. If the options contract is exercised, the covered writer can "cover" the contract because he or she holds the underlying security. Options are contracts that give the buyer the right but not the obligation to buy (call) or sell (put) shares at a particular price and future date.

BREAKING DOWN 'Covered Writer'

Covered options writers limit risk by owning the underlying security. The covered writer profits by receiving premiums paid by the purchaser of the options contract. Covered writing is generally more conservative that naked writing, where the options seller does not own the underlying security.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. When does one sell a put option, and when does one sell a call option?

    The incorporation of options into all types of investment strategies has quickly grown in popularity among individual investors. ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Generally, penny stocks are traded through the use of the Over the Counter Bulletin Board (OTCBB) and through pink sheets. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where can I buy penny stocks?

    Some penny stocks, those using the definition of trading for less than $5 per share, are traded on regular exchanges such ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The price of an American depositary receipt (ADR) is determined by the bank or other financial institution that issues it. ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
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