Cox-Ingersoll-Ross Model - CIR

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Cox-Ingersoll-Ross Model - CIR '

A mathematical formula used to model interest rate movements driven by a sole source of market risk. The Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model (CIR model) believes that short-term interest rates can be represented via a square root diffusion model with a mean reversion. The CIR model is often used in the valuation of interest rate derivatives.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cox-Ingersoll-Ross Model - CIR '

The CIR model was developed in 1985 by John C. Cox, Jonathan E. Ingersoll and Stephen A. Ross as an offshoot of the Vasicek Interest Rate model. Like the CIR model, the Vasicek model is also a one-factor modeling method. However, the Vasicek model allows for negative interest rates. This is the biggest advantage of the CIR model.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Vasicek Interest Rate Model

    A method of modeling interest rate movement that describes the ...
  2. Federal Open Market Committee - ...

    The branch of the Federal Reserve Board that determines the direction ...
  3. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where ...
  4. Fixed Interest Rate

    An interest rate on a liability, such as a loan or mortgage, ...
  5. Interest Rate Ceiling

    The maximum interest rate that a financial institution can charge ...
  6. Interest Rate

    The amount charged, expressed as a percentage of principal, by ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What’s Holding Back the U.S. Consumer

    Even as job growth has surged and gasoline prices have plunged, U.S. consumers are proving slow to respond and repair their overextended balance sheets.
  2. Economics

    The Problem With Today’s Headline Economic Data

    Headwinds have kept the U.S. growth more moderate than in the past–including leverage levels and an aging population—and the latest GDP revisions prove it.
  3. Economics

    Explaining the Participation Rate

    The participation rate is the percentage of civilians who are either employed or unemployed and looking for a job.
  4. Economics

    What Qualifies as Full Employment?

    Full employment is an economic term describing a situation where all available labor resources are being utilized to their highest extent.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Is India the Next Emerging Markets Superstar?

    With a shift towards manufacturing and services, India could be the next emerging market superstar. Here, we provide a detailed breakdown of its GDP.
  6. Investing News

    Timing of the Fed Interest Rates Hike

    Until the beginning of August, Fed watchers expected the central bank to raise rates in September. However, recent news pertaining to China’s slowing economy and its devaluation of the yuan have ...
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Guggenheim Enhanced Short Dur

    Find out about the Guggenheim Enhanced Short Duration ETF, and learn detailed information about this fund that focuses on fixed-income securities.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Morningstar Small-Cap Value

    Find out about the Shares Morningstar Small-Cap Value ETF, and learn detailed information about this exchange-traded fund that focuses on small-cap equities.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares MSCI KLD 400 Social

    Find out about the iShares MSCI KLD 400 Social exchange-traded fund, and learn detailed information about its characteristics, suitability and recommendations.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Agency Bond

    Find out about the iShares Agency Bond exchange-traded fund, and explore detailed analysis of the ETF that tracks U.S. government agency securities.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the best ways to sell an annuity?

    The best ways to sell an annuity are to locate buyers from insurance agents or companies that specialize in connecting buyers ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How can the federal reserve increase aggregate demand?

    The Federal Reserve can increase aggregate demand in indirect ways by lowering interest rates. Aggregate demand is a measure ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the stock market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The stock market reacts to changes in the federal funds rate in various ways depending on where it is in the business cycle. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!